Rebalancing 3 Common Problems

Rebalancing 3 Common Problems
Rebalancing 3 Common Problems

Monday, August 25, 2014

Five Elements: Rebalancing 3 Common Problems

I’ve had several readers ask about particular “cures” for bringing themselves back into balance using the Five Elements, so I decided that rather than telling just them, that I might share some cures in a blog entry, since these are all pretty common imbalances.  One reader asked me how she might deal with her tendency to worry.  Another reader said he sometimes has great difficulty expressing himself clearly and succinctly.  A third reader just feels burned out sometimes- her energy just goes from 100 to 0 MPH, and she gets absolutely exhausted.

The Five Elements can be described as the stages of change, a philosophy developed in East Asia as early as 475 B.C.  The Five Elements are: water, wood, fire, earth and metal.  These symbolic names were unpretentious categories for the energy conveyed at each phase of life.  This theory directly affected Chinese medicine and brought balance back within the earth as well as for an individual. If you haven’t yet read the blog entries published on 7/28 and 8/4, I recommend you do before you continue with this one.  It will make a whole lot more sense to you.

Take a look again at the associations within this symbiotic series of relationships:
Elements
Water
Wood
Fire
Earth
Metal
Emotions
Fear
Anger
Joy
Absent-minded
Grief
Orientation
North
East
South
Center
West
Season
Winter
Spring
Summer
Harvest
Autumn
Climate
Cold
Wind
Heat
Damp
Dryness
Flavors
Salty
Sour
Bitter
Sweet
Pungent
Meats
Seafood
Fresh meat, fowl
Spicy/dried meat
Beef, wild game
Fresh H2O seafood
Fruits/Veg.
pitted fruits, soup
Fresh fruit & veg.
Dried, spicy
Root veg.; melon
Abundant F&V
Shapes
Undulating
Vertical Lines
Triangle
Squares/Rectangles
arched; oval
Personality
Philosopher
Creator
Networker
Team Builder
Manager
Colors
Black/Dark hues
Green/Blue
Red, bright flames
Yellow, green, brown
White, pastels, metallics

1.   Overabundance of Earth Element: An example

Worry is associated with the Earth Element, and although it’s not the only possible symptom of an Earth imbalance, it’s a common one.  If you wish to control your worry, then you would want to control the Earth Element by one of several means. You could do one or two (not all!) of the following things:

Add some of the Child of Earth, which is Metal by:
·         Placing columns or long drapes in your environment;
·         Wear some green and khaki colors;
·         Add a fun and varied exercise program to your daily life;
Lessen the supply of energy to Earth by lessening Fire, its Mother’s energy by:
·         Avoiding naturally sweet, root vegetables for a period of time;
·         Avoiding wearing soft pastel yellow, greens and tans;
·         Avoiding rectangles and squares in your décor.
Lessen the Earth Element directly by:
·         Avoid wearing yellow, green, tan and orange;
·         Avoid eating naturally sweet foods and root vegetables for a period of time;
·         Purge any closet or area of your home that’s accumulated clutter.
Add some Wood Element, which controls Earth in the Restrictive Cycle by:
·         Start an exercise program that you can/will follow like walking or weight lifting;
·         Add some sour flavors and fresh meat, fruit, and vegetables your diet;
·         Wear more practical clothing such as khaki jeans and denim (no elastic!) in your clothing.




2.   Lacking of the Water Element: An example

Verbal expression is associated with the Water Element, and although it’s not the only possible symptom of a Water imbalance, it’s a common one.  If you wish to think and express yourself clearly and succinctly, then you would want to fortify the Water Element by one of several means. You could do one or two (not all!) of the following things:

Add some of the Mother of Water, which is Metal by:
·         Placing arches or oval shapes or metal in your environment;
·         Wear some white or metallic colors often;
·         Add white accents throughout your home;
Lessen the supply of energy to Wood, Water’s Child’s energy by:
·         Avoiding fresh meat, vegetables and fruit for a period of time;
·         Avoiding wearing greens and blues;
·         Avoiding vertical lines (such as long drapes) in your décor.
Feeding the Water Element directly by:
·         Wearing dark and flowing clothing;
·         Eating more seafood, soups, pitted fruits for a period of time;
·         Take long baths, swim, or visit the ocean for your vacation or weekend get-away.




3.   Lacking of the Fire Element: An example


Burn-out is associated with the Fire Element, and although it’s not the only possible symptom, it’s not uncommon for a person with a lot of Fire in their personality to push and push themselves until they feel completely exhausted.  If you wish to think and express yourself clearly and succinctly, then you would want to fortify the Water Element by one of several means. You could do one or two (not all!) of the following things:

 Add some of the Mother of Fire, which is Wood by:
·         Placing columns or long drapes in your environment;
·         Wear some green and khaki colors;
·         Add a fun and varied exercise program to your daily life;
 Lessen the supply of energy to Earth, Fire’s Child by:
·         Avoiding naturally sweet, root vegetables for a period of time;
·         Avoiding wearing soft pastel yellow, greens and tans;
·         Avoiding rectangles and squares in your décor.
 Feeding the Fire Element directly by:
·         Wearing red, orange and yellow clothing;
·         Eating spicy or barbequed, or dried meats and fruits;
·         Rely on your many friends to talk with about your feelings.



Do you experience any of these three feelings of imbalance in your life?  Try to select those choices that feel comfortable and right for you. 

If you would like to know more about yourself and others, and how you can create a more joyful and fulfilling personal or professional life, please go to www.TransformationsforInteriors.com and contact me through email, phone call or text.  I’d love to help you understand yourself and those who make up your world of friends and family.  Next week, I’ll talk a bit more about Five Element Theory and how you can use it to create cures or remedies to rebalance your five Elements.

Monday, August 18, 2014

Transitional Style

Blend traditional and contemporary styles together and what do you get?  Transitional!   Generally speaking, transitional style incorporates lines that are less ornamental than traditional design, but not as unadorned as contemporary. Classic, ageless, and pure would be adjectives to describe this style.  This style focuses on comfort and being user-friendly to meet an active lifestyle, while contemporary furniture is not often as practical or relaxing.  The focus is on the cleanness of the design while maintaining its refinement. Scale is generous but not overpowering.  As importantly, the style equally addresses both masculine (yang) and feminine (yin) qualities and characteristics.


Colors:
The palette of transitional style relies on a combination of neutral colors: white, crème, tan, or vanilla, taupe, with additions of browns for depth or a combo of greys…

Example 1: Tans







 
Example 2: Taupes

 

Example 3: Greys

 
… And possibly (dare I say) the addition of a pastel such as light blue, soft aqua, lavender, peach or butter yellow.


Transitional furnishings

Furnishings have strong profiles and forthright style — not a Baroque or Rococo ornamentation to be found. Placid curves and straight lines create a marriage of energy.

You can add older furniture styles, but use updated versions, like a modern wing chair or a pared-down étagère. Keep the scale on the larger side: enough to feel inviting and the seating padded and cozy; you want to sit down and settle in comfortably.


 
 
Fabrics:

Fabrics are also soft and comfy.  Soft cottons, ultrasuedes, supple leathers, and touchable chenilles work well in chic patterns and sophisticated solids.
 

 
 
 
 

 
Accessories:

A minimalist approach requires steady and astute editing. Artwork should be simply framed. Lamps and lighting should have strong, clean lines.  This elemental grouping of accessories will complement your furniture and the less-is-more approach of this style.


It’s Popular Because:
If you look through home design magazines such as Veranda, Luxe, Elle Décor, Décor, or HGTV at least 50% of the rooms you’ll view are transitional design. Transitional style signifies that there’s a balance between contemporary and traditional, so you don’t have to deviate from the familiar while having the freedom to refresh it as you feel so inspired.  Your room can reflect current trends, so it holds its appeal over time.



You Will Be Drawn to Transitional if…

You yearn for the authentic.  You prefer to wear one real jewel over lots of necklaces or chandelier earrings.  You’d rather be alone than with a bunch of people who aren’t true friends...  If you prefer to be in charge because your standards are higher than most people’s and you aren’t afraid of that fact...  A trip to an elegant spa is far better day than one sharing a beach with a bunch of people… And (in Feng shui terms) you have some Metal in your personality!
 

Questions? 

Need help in deciding what works best in your interiors? Write back and we’ll “talk” online, or give me a call and we’ll discuss your challenges as well as your design needs and desires. Check out my website,www.TransformationsforInteriors.com or check out my Pinterest collectionshttp://pinterest.com/shelleynordlund/ for more inspiration.


Monday, August 11, 2014

Mediterranean Décor = Spanish Modern Style

While Mediterranean Style is most often used in warmer environments, its décor can be utilized to add warmth and color to your home’s interiors. To achieve this style, consider the colors of nature that occur around the Mediterranean Sea.






When you think about the countries that surround the beautiful and amazing Mediterranean Sea, we can see that Spain, France, Monaco, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia, Montenegro, Greece, Turkey, Syria, Lebanon and Israel have borders on this beautiful expanse of water.  On the African continent, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Egypt also frame this stretch of blue.  The original sources for the decor style Mediterranean really come primarily from Spain, Italy, Greece and Morocco.  Today, the same style is sometimes referred to as Spanish Modern.  The style, however can range from very formal in nature to casual and functional.



The Basics:
Walls are often textured with stucco, Venetian plaster or other painting technique. Layers of paint and glaze are hand-rubbed onto plaster or sand-textured walls to add visual depth.   Warm hues such as terra cotta, gold, yellow, sand or crème are regularly used on the walls.  






Floors are often embellished with ceramic tiles that again reflect the warm tones or the sea and sky in the region.  Stairways are a classic means of vertically displaying these beautiful tiles.





Furniture:
Furniture pieces are generally short but substantial, often with ornately turned legs and feet.  Hardware tends to be heavy metal with a burnished or bronzed finish.  Edges on furniture pieces tends to be bull-nosed rather that angular.







Accessories:
Light fixtures tend to be metallic filigree or wrought iron with curves being important to the overall look.  Burnished bronze urns, heavy pottery pots, and wrought iron fireplace screens all exemplify the look of the Mediterranean. Candlesticks and figurines made of bronze, copper or iron are all characteristic accents.  These intricately designed accessories should be used somewhat sparingly to provide the eye some space to move from piece to piece.





In conclusion:
If this is your style, and you want to share your designs, we’d all love to see pictures! If this old world style appeals to you and you need help, check out www.TransformationsforInteriors.com and contact me.  We can work together to convert your ordinary space into an extraordinary place where you can thrive.